Gender Differences in Perceived Stress and Mental Health

Authors

  • Iram Mansoor
  • Maqbool Ahmad Khan
  • Khadijah-tul-Kubra

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5909661

Keywords:

Perceived Stress, Mental Health, Gender Difference, Medical Students

Abstract

Abstract


Objective: To investigate the gender differences in perceived stress and mental health in medical
students of Lahore, Pakistan.
Methodology: The current study was cross-sectional in nature conducted at two private medical
colleges in Lahore. Data was collected using stratified random sampling. Sample size was 300 (150
males & 150 females) students selected from all five years of two medical colleges. For assessment
purpose Demographic form, Perceived Stress Scale for Medical Students (PSSMS) for stress assessment
and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21) for mental health evaluation were used.
Results: For statistical analysis descriptive statistics was used for demographics details and from
inferential statistics t-test was used for a clear picture of gender differences in perceived stress and
mental health issues. Results revealed that in PSSMS scale only one subscale of burnout showed significant differences (p=.001) which revealed that males were more burnout than females. Significant
gender differences were found for DASS Total (p=.007), and its subscale of Stress (p=.000), and
Depression (p=.004).
Conclusion: Our findings revealed that females demonstrate high level of stress, depression and on
the whole more mental health issues than their male counterparts. On the other hand in Perceived
Stress Scale for Medical Students (PSSMS) there were no significant differences in dimensions of
social stressors, academic stressors and mistrust. Burnout was only one dimension in which male
showed high burnout than female students. Gender appeared to influence the mental health of
students.

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Published

27-01-2022 — Updated on 13-03-2022

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How to Cite

Iram Mansoor, Khan, M. A. ., & Khadijah-tul-Kubra. (2022). Gender Differences in Perceived Stress and Mental Health. MedERA - Journal of CMH LMC and IOD, 3(2). https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5909661 (Original work published January 27, 2022)